State Water Board Meets in North Shore for the First Time

State Water Board Meets in North Shore for the First Time

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For the first time ever, the State Water Resources Control Board met at the salton sea in north shore to discuss possible solutions for the preservation of California’s largest lake. During this workshop, the Board talked about possible solutions for the revitalizations of the sea. These are propositions that have been talked about for years and haven’t been implemented, despite the millions in funding for these projects. NBC Palm Springs talked to Fred Ruiz with Audubon California, a wildlife preservation organization, who says he expects more from the board.

“The state agreed to develop and construct projects to cover at least 1,800 acres by the end of 2019. So far, they have done nothing.”

Something that Fred says is simply not fair.

“The Salton Sea has an evaporation rate of 1,300,000 acre feet of water. So with that, losing the habitats for the habitats and exposing toxic waste.”

He even states that the deterioration of the sea has led to declining air quality that isn’t just affecting wildlife

“You know, it is concerning because this region is well known that is has the biggest asthma rate in the state of California. Not only asthma but COPD.

So, what’s the board doing to hold governor gavin newsom accountable for uplifting the salton sea? The director of the board, E. Joaquin Esquivel, says the answer is simple.

“The Salton Sea is such an incredible resource, but the problem is the community has no recreational access to it. So we are really going to try to engage them and continue to find those opportunities to bring people down here to recreate at the sea.”

As it stands, the state has secured $280,000,000 in funds. Something that Fred would like to see put to good use.

“I would love to see the 10 year plan, which has three purposes. One, to provide habitats. Two, to protect public health, and to create amenities for the community that lives around here.”

A plan that, if implemented, would greatly benefit the community.

“The community deserves to have not a toxic wasteland but something beautiful,” added Fred.

The Board of Directors is optimistic that it will, together with the community, find innovative solutions to revitalize the Salton Sea in order to make it a place that people come to see from around the world.